"

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

"
Libby Anne (via oatmeal47)

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

asmilinggoddess:

this show is incredible


On The Run Tour in Chicago, IL (July 24th, 2014)

On The Run Tour in Chicago, IL (July 24th, 2014)

"Sometimes,
I wake up
at four in the morning
and taste smoke
in the back of my throat.

I swear to god,
you’re still burning
somewhere inside me."
seven-devils-in-my-house:

fierocity:

imyobabyy:

lady-medic:

In case anyone wanted to know what a lightening strike can do to the body- given that they survive.

Woah
Do a search for “struck by lightning”

I’ve reblogged this before but I didn’t know it was from a lightning strike. That’s insane.

-

seven-devils-in-my-house:

fierocity:

imyobabyy:

lady-medic:

In case anyone wanted to know what a lightening strike can do to the body- given that they survive.

Woah

Do a search for “struck by lightning”

I’ve reblogged this before but I didn’t know it was from a lightning strike. That’s insane.

-

letsdropacidwiththebeatles:

Trippy ☮
609
"Originally, in the 20s and 30s, the stereotype of someone who was schizophrenic was the housewife who was sad and withdrawn, and would not do her duties as a housewife; would not do the housework. This was the typical case of schizophrenia. And then, in the 60s, something shifted. The actual criteria for schizophrenia shifted. A lot of psychiatrists and hospitals and police were encountering young, angry black men who were part of the civil rights movement. Who were part of the riots – the uprisings – in the Black Power movement. Who were angry. Who were perceiving a conspiracy of power against them, that was called paranoia. They would see it is white privilege, but it was called paranoia. And so we actually see the diagnositc criteria for schizophrenia change. So now you have anger and paranoia and hostility being included as criteria, whereas 30 years before they hadn’t been. Because the stereotype has changed. So there’s a way in which the DSM and the perspectives of the psychiatrists and the doctors who were giving these diagnoses is thoroughly politically constructed, and thoroughly dependent on the culture and context that they’re within."

Will Hall at Unitarian Church Vancouver Canada March 2012 - Transcript | Madness Radio (via blinko)

for anyone interested in reading more about how schizophrenia moved from being a diagnosis assigned to white, middle-class women to one used to pathologize and institutionalize noncompliant black men in the 1960s, jonathan metzl’s the protest psychosis: how schizophrenia became a black disease is a good place to start. i have a PDF scan of it, too — just ask.

(via onegirlrhumba)

"The world has a serious shortage of both logic and kindness."
Haruki Murakami, 1Q84 (via daiyuu)
518
Anonymous asked:
Why not fall in love?

brianashanee:

I got shit to do